Global Issues Film Festival 2012-13

Oct 10, 2012

From community healing ceremonies in Sierra Leone to the world-wide overconsumption of plastic, the Global Issues Film Festival continues to show us the world through the documentarian’s lens.

Kettering University, Mott Community College and UM-Flint are partnering for a ninth year to host the 11th Annual Global Issues Film Festival.  For the first half of the festival, five thought-provoking films will be shown Nov. 14 through Nov. 18, on the Mott Community College and UM-Flint campuses. 

Divided in two parts, the second half of the Festival will be shown Jan. 30-Feb. 2, 2013 on the campus of Kettering University. The films are: Brothers on the Line, One Peace at a Time, Blood of the Amazon, This Land is our Land and The 800 Mile Wall.

The Global Issues Film Festival continues its tradition of bringing provocative films to Flint, featuring the work of independent filmmakers from around the globe. All films are offered free of charge. Screenings take place in the UM-Flint KIVA and the Great Lakes Technology Center Auditorium at Mott Community College.

The first half of this season’s schedule includes:

The Films:

We’re Not Broke (2012), Wednesday, Nov. 14 at 5:30 p.m. in the UM-Flint KIVA and Friday, Nov. 16, 7 p.m. at Mott Community College (81 minutes) directed by Karin Hayes and Victoria Bruce.  This is the story of how U.S. corporations have been able to hide over a trillion dollars from Uncle Sam, and how seven fed-up Americans from across the country, take their frustration to the streets . . . and vow to make the corporations pay their fair share.  http://werenotbrokemovie.com/ 

Bag IT (2010), Saturday, Nov. 17, 1 p.m. (88 minutes) directed by Suzan Beraza. An average guy makes a resolution to stop using plastic bags at the grocery store. Little does he know that this simple decision will change his life completely. He comes to the conclusion that our consumptive use of plastic has finally caught up to us, and looks at what we can do about it. Today. Right now. http://www.bagitmovie.com/index.html 

Fambul Tok (2011), urday, Nov. 17, 3 p.m. (82 minutes) directed by SaraTerry. Victims and perpetrators of Sierra Leone’s brutal civil war come together for the first time in an unprecedented program of tradition-based truth-telling and forgiveness ceremonies. Through reviving their ancient practice of fambul tok (family talk), Sierra Leoneans are building sustainable peace at the grass-roots level – succeeding where the international community’s post-conflict efforts failed. This film explores the depths of a culture that believes that true justice lies in redemption and healing for individuals – and that forgiveness is the surest path to restoring dignity and building strong communities. http://www.fambultok.com/

Lioness (2010), Sunday, Nov. 18, 3 p.m. (108 minutes) directed by Meg McLagan and Daria Sommers. Lioness tells the story of a group of female Army support soldiers who were part of the first program in American history to send women into direct ground combat. Without the same training as their male counterparts but with a commitment to serve as needed, these young women fought in some of the bloodiest counterinsurgency battles of the Iraq war and returned home as part of this country’s first generation of female combat veterans. http://www.lionessthefilm.com/ 

The 11th Annual Global Issues Film Festival, hosted by Kettering University, Mott Community College and the University of Michigan-Flint, continues its tradition of bringing provocative films to Flint. This collaborative festival includes the work of independent filmmakers from around the globe, representing a variety of voices and viewpoints.