Joe Salacuse

Dr. Joe Salacuse is professor of mathematics. His area of interest is computational physics which includes molecular dynamic simulation of atomic and molecular systems in the fluid state to obtain equilibrium thermodynamic and structural properties of a substance. His most recent efforts involve comparing simulation results with real experimental results as a means of better understanding the interaction forces in a simple fluid such as krypton. Dr. Salacuse has published or presented several papers.

Brian McCartin

Dr. Brian McCartin, professor of Applied Mathematics
Ph.D. in Applied Mathematics from Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences--New York University, with expertise in differential equations and computational mathematics.

McCartin has taught at Kettering for 15 years and finds that one distinguishing element of a Kettering student is their level of maturity. He describes students as intelligent, motivated and applied in their pursuit of academic and professional excellence.

Ilya Kudish

Dr. Ilya I. Kudish, professor of applied mathematics, specializes in applied mathematics, tribology, contact mechanics, theory of elastohydrodynamic lubrication, crack mechanics, theoretical prediction of fatigue wear and pitting. He has written more than 100 articles, and is the author of a book entitled, "Mathematical Modeling of Wear and Fatigue in Rolling Bearings." He is a reviewer for Wear Journal and ASME Journal of Tribology. Dr. Kudish has extensive research experience.

Ruben Hayrapetyan

Dr. Ruben Hayrapetyan, professor of Mathematics
Ph.D. in Mathematics from Yerevan Armenia State University in 1981, and a Ph.D. in Applied Mathematics, with expertise in Partial Differential Equations, Inverse and Ill-posed Problems, Nonlinear Analysis, Numerical Methods.

After working with Kettering students for eight years, Hayrapetyan finds them motivated, with a clear understanding of their goals. He enjoys convincing students that they are able to solve challenging problems both in Math and in their lives.

Pages